Tailored Men’s Shirts #7

This post finally wraps up my series on tips for tailoring men’s shirts. I have one final tailoring trick along with the before and after pictures.

Final trick: The Secret Button

The secret button is a life-saver for many women with breasts > B cups. The idea is men’s shirt typically have buttons spaced further apart and don’t account for boobs. Because of this, the shirts are a little tight on the chest area and causes a little peek-a-boo hole between buttons.

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The fix can be easily done with a safety pin and I’m going to tell you, I do this. For me, it is worth hurting my fingers and brain for 10 minutes while I figure out how to put the safety pin in to close this gap. Also the language barrier I have with my cheap tailor’s is too significant to introduce this idea. That being said, you might have better luck, as one of my friends did. Basically you put a button on the inside of the shirt in the middle of the gap. Then you put a button hole across from it and it closes the gap secretly. I drew a picture haha due to lack of shirt and my urge to finish this subject.

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If that doesn’t make sense… you can say so in a comment and I will just go get one done.

So that’s the last trick I have. Here’s a summary of my tips:

-Tailoring is expensive, but can be worth it. Set a budget and check out sales racks or the thrift store.

– The most expensive part is getting the shoulder taken in so that’s the first thing to look at.

– Secret button prevents peek-a-boo holes

– It’s easiest to tailor shirts if you have wider shoulders than you do hips… so break out those dumb bells! When hemming the bottom, you can ask for a arcs on the sides (sorry not sure what they are called) so that you shirt doesn’t go straight across and tug at your hips. (See below)

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– Typical alterations include sleeves shortened, hemmed at the bottom, and taken in at the sides. Keep this in mind when you buy it because this might change the design or chop off a logo.

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Men’s Tailored Shirts #6

The shoulders were a little long on this shirt so I had them taken in an inch (most places won’t let you take it in too much more). That is the only thing I had done. The sleeves’ starting point was already a little above my elbow so I figured an inch would be good enough.

Before

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After

You can see the sleeve is now a little higher up the elbow. I like my sleeves a little shorter still so I could take this back in again, and probably will. I posted this anyway even though it’s not the finished project, just so you all could see the effect of this action alone.

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And a side by side comparison since the change is not very dramatic:

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I still think, even though it’s barely noticable, that the shirt looks sharper when the shoulder is where it should be. Showing off your arms a little can be good and having the sleeve come up a little is a good way to do that.

I’ll write a summary post on this series, then I’ll write a little about choosing colors!

Tailored Men’s Shirts #5

The focus of today: sleeves. I bought this Ezekial shirt (on sale of course) and decided I liked it, could get in taken in at the sides… except the sleeves where an inch or two too long. You can also see the shoulder is long. So just take in the shoulder and the sleeves right? Well if you look closely at the bottom of the sleeves is a light strip of fabric that ties in the colors and design from the main part of the shirt, covering the chest. I wanted to keep this pattern on the tip of the sleeve. So I could only get the shoulders tucked in.

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Shoulders tucked in, after:

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Getting the shoulders tucked in only raised the sleeve up, away from my elbow an inch. The sleeves aren’t where I want them to be, sadly. This is something to take into account anytime you buy a short sleeve to tailor. I’ve had to get logos cut off as well, including the Nike logo at the bottom of my sleeve in the golf shirt I used to introduce this topic.

So for anyone looking to use these tips… also take into account the sleeves.

Tailored Men’s Shirts #3

To figure out what to do at the tailor’s, you have to understand body shapes:

Men are usually taller than women and don’t have the hips that many women do. By that I mean, men’s body shapes are typically rectangular or triangle shaped, where their shoulders and hips are the same size, or the shoulders are wider than their hips. Women on the other hand don’t typically have these shapes, of minor hip curves (rectangular) or developed shoulders and narrow waists (triangular). For the women who do, and want to wear men’s clothes, YOU ARE IN LUCK! You may be able to find shirts with minimal tailoring. See below:

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My best friend is rocking a men’s shirt. She has long arms and is average men’s height. She can rock men’s shirts all day.

So before you buy a men’s shirt to tailor, look at your own body type and compare it to the style of the shirt. If you have wide hips and big boobs, you may want to get a big shirt and tailor is to accent your curves, and take out some length in the arms and shoulder. Below is another friend wearing a great fitting outfit that takes her body type into account.

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Tailored Men’s Shirts #2

Example time.
Before:

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This is a billabong shirt I found on a discount rack for like $12.

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It’s long… the sleeves are long and the sides are likely to flap in the wind.

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It’s not horrible but it’s not a fit that looks great.

After:
I had the shoulders taken in, sleeves shortened, sides taken in and hemmed at the bottom to make it shorter.

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I think it looks much bettter. I know this went a tad over the budget I stated in my last post but because I dropped off a few shirts at the same time and am a returning customer, they throw in some discounts. Hope you enjoyed seeing these I’ll post more tomorrow.

Tailored Men’s Shirt #1

I just got a bunch of shirts tailored and will be writing a series of entries on the topic, including before and after pictures. Men’s shirts are designed for men, who usually have longer proportions than women and no curves or hips at the bottom. So for anyone who has never attempted going to a tailor, there are a few different things you can request… specific to tailoring men’s shirts: sleeves shortened, shoulder taken in, sides taken in, length shortened. My tailor charges about $10 for each procedure, except the shoulder which is $19.

My rule of thumb when shopping for men’s clothes includes tailoring costs. Personally, I won’t buy a shirt or pants over $50. I will spend $100 max on a dress because it is a top and bottom I’m just trying to get through the night at that point. If I really love a shirt and it’s just big and long but the shoulder fits… then it better be under $20 because I’m adding tailor costs $30 to the cost of the shirt before I even buy it. So if you are looking at going this route ever, look at sales and keep the shoulder length as priority.

There are men’s shirts that I find I don’t have to get tailored. Urban Outfitters carries several brands of men’s shirts that are slim fitting, have high enough sleeves, short enough etc. So I will start with that. Below is a picture of a men’s shirts that I felt fit me well without having to get tailored.

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The sleeves don’t go past my elbows, but they are a little long, and I don’t look like I have a TON of material on my sides, so it’s slimming. So for an off the rack shirt for a different gender, i think it fits well and is not worth tailoring. Just ignore my collar and the wrinkles.

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Tailored Men’s Shorts 4

Today I’m weaing these bronze-ish brown and white mens shorts that I had tailored. The zipper is pretty long so I probably couldnt do a split in these but I guess thats fine I will just have to remember not to do one today. 

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These definitely do not come up enough in the back but they are long enough to pass in a catholic school while still showing a little leg so thats good for me.

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Since the zipper/inseam was so long I had the tailor only leave about an inch or two of the shorts.

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Supporting the hometown team today

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Today is the last day of this tailored men’s shorts series. I have recently bought some men’s shirts for tailoring and will post about that in the upcoming weeks. Thank you for reading.

Tailored Men’s Shorts 3

Today I’m sporting another pair of men’s shorts today while I run some errands. These shorts have a short zipper which is great: minimal bunching. It’s also loose enough on the thigh to not get stuck when slid up. BUT the cut still doesn’t allow enough room for my butt to be completely covered. So, once again, I’ll be wearing some boxers and a long shirt as a precaution.

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Sporting a shirt from my sister college and their pub crawl event. 🙂

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Bunching isn’t awful

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But, like many men’s shorts, they don’t come up as high as I’d like in the back. I think I asked for 2 inches length on these so they are on the short side. I usually ask for the length to be anywhere between 2 to 5 inches.

Tailored Men’s Shorts 2

More content on tailored men’s shorts: Today I’m wearing shorts that break rule #2, the butt rule. They don’t bunch up as much but I definitely can’t bend over in them… even with a belt on, the cut is just weird. But this doesn’t dissuade me because I like the print too much. My advice: either wear a  kind of long t shirt and/or boxer briefs  that say “I don’t mind if these show.” Some girls find it attractive to see boxer briefs peeking out. So here is me doing the both technique.

Wearing a local gym shirt with my shorts. The zipper is shorter so less bunching but the cut doesn’t allow for a butt. And yeah the pocket is showing in the picture… It’s because I’m squatting though. Another added bonus to men’s bottoms are bigger pockets!

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See how the boxer briefs cover up where my ass crack would be? I scrunched up the shirt for the picture.

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